Cheap Travel Insurance For People With Motor Neurone Disease

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With motor neurone disease you really should take travel insurance out when you go on holiday or travel abroad just in case you fall ill and need medical treatment as the NHS will not provide treatment whilst you are on holiday. The cost of receiving medical treatment outside the UK can be very expensive and the travel insurance will repay most of these costs provided you took it out before you left for your holiday.

In addition if you need assistance to get home, like an ambulance or medical staff to accompany you, then the travel insurance will pay for the costs associated with repatriation too.

For those with pre-existing medical conditions travel insurance can be expensive unless you shop around (this link might help you find cheap travel insurance for people with motor neurone disease).

Travellers with motor neurone disease have in the past paid significantly more for their travel insurance as those with motor neurone disease, like many other sufferers of a pre-existing condition have had their premiums raised. The travel insurance companies consider those that are under the treatment of a doctor, even on a routine basis, may be more likely to claim and hence cause them to have to pay out.

Additional rating factors which effect travel insurance are high blood pressure, high cholesterol and whether you smoke.

Motor neurone disease and travel insurance

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) – also referred to as motor neurone disease (MND) in most Commonwealth countries, and as Lou Gehrig's disease in the United Kingdom – is a debilitating disease with varied etiology characterised by rapidly progressive weakness, muscle atrophy and fasciculations, muscle spasticity, difficulty speaking (dysarthria), difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), and difficulty breathing (dyspnea). ALS is the most common of the five motor neuron diseases.

The disorder causes muscle weakness and atrophy throughout the body due to the degeneration of the upper and lower motor neurons. Unable to function, the muscles weaken and exhibit atrophy. Individuals affected by the disorder may ultimately lose the ability to initiate and control all voluntary movement, although bladder and bowel sphincters and the muscles responsible for eye movement are usually, spared until the terminal stages of the disease.

Cognitive function is generally spared for most patients, although some (about 5%) also have frontotemporal dementia. A higher proportion of patients (30–50%) also have more subtle cognitive changes which may go unnoticed, but are revealed by detailed neuropsychological testing. Sensory nerves and the autonomic nervous system are generally unaffected, meaning the majority of people with ALS will maintain hearing, sight, touch, smell, and taste.

All of these factors will be taken into account when you apply for travel insurance with motor neurone disease.

Finally, those that are awaiting a diagnosis or additional tests face the heftiest premiums as what insurers’ hate most of all is uncertainty, especially around the possible risk of falling ill abroad with a condition that isn’t yet well controlled.